Brain Tumor Overview

A brain tumor or intracranial neoplasm occurs when abnormal cells form within the brain.[1] There are two main types of tumors: malignant or cancerous tumors and benign tumors.

Cancerous tumors can be divided into primary tumors that start within the brain, and secondary tumors that have spread from somewhere else, known as brain metastasis tumors.

‘Tumor Paint’ brain-tumor-detecting dye

The FDA has approved an investigational new drug application for Tumor Paint BLZ-100, a protein-linked dye that highlights cancer cells in images so surgeons can precisely target brain tumors.The FDA move means Blaze Bioscience can proceed with clinical trials.

Twenty-one adult patients who need surgery for often-deadly glioma brain tumors are expected to enroll in the study, which is aimed at examining the safety of injecting the BLZ-100 molecule into the bloodstream, where it rushes to highlight cancer cells.

Transplant drug could boost power of brain tumor treatments, study finds

Every day, organ transplant patients around the world take a drug called rapamycin to keep their immune systems from rejecting their new kidneys and hearts.

New research suggests that the same drug could help brain tumor patients by boosting the effect of new immune-based therapies.

Blending High-end Imaging Techniques

Vanderbilt University researchers have achieved the first “image fusion” of mass spectrometry and microscopy that could, among other things, dramatically improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

Combining the best features of both imaging modalities allows scientists to see the molecular make-up of tissues in high resolution.

Nature Methods 2/23/2015

MP-MUS destroys brain tumor cells

An experimental drug that attacks brain tumor tissue by crippling the cells’ energy source called the mitochondria has passed early tests in animal models and human tissue cultures, say Houston Methodist scientists.

Our past work has shown that MP-MUS has very low toxicity until it gets into tumor cells. Once it arrives, it is changed to its active form, doing a lot of damage where we want it to, leaving healthy brain cells alone — a bit like a ‘smart bomb.’ To our knowledge, this is the first known example of selective mitochondrial chemotherapy.

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