Giorgio Ascoli

University Professor, Volgenau Bioengineering Department, George Mason University
Founding Director, Center for Neural Informatics, Structures, & Plasticity (CN3)
Director, Computational Neuroanatomy Group (CNG)
Founding Editor-in-Chief, Neuroinformatics

The main effort of Dr. Ascoli's lab is to connect the cellular organization of brain networks to cognitive functions such as learning and memory. His laboratory hosts and curates a central inventory of digitally reconstructed neurons in NeuroMorpho.Org and Hippocampome knowledge  base and has developed L-Neuron, a neuron modeling  tool. His  long-term scientific and philosophical goal consists in establishing a working model for the highest cognitive functions such as human consciousness.

Trees of the Brain Presentation

Mason Publishing, the George Mason University Libraries, and the University Bookstore present Mason University Professor Giorgio A. Ascoli, discussing his book Trees of the Brain, Roots of the Mind, in the kickoff of the Mason Author Series.

This inaugural event of the series, which is sponsored by the George Mason University Bookstore, was held in the Fenwick Library Main Reading Room, on Tuesday, March 29th, at 2:30 p.m.

GMU Neuro592

The human brain is often described as the most complex object in the universe. Tens of billions of nerve cells-tiny tree-like structures—make up a massive network with enormous computational power.

GMU Neuro592 is based on the book, Trees of the Brain, Roots of the Mind, by Giorgio Ascoli. This course reveals another aspect of the human brain: the stunning beauty of its cellular form. Doing so, Giorgio makes a provocative claim about the mind-brain relationship.

Trees of the Brain, Roots of the Mind – by Giorgio Ascoli

The human brain is often described as the most complex object in the universe. Tens of billions of nerve cells-tiny tree-like structures—make up a massive network with enormous computational power.

In this book, Giorgio Ascoli reveals another aspect of the human brain: the stunning beauty of its cellular form. Doing so, he makes a provocative claim about the mind-brain relationship.

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