Princeton Neuroscience Institute

The Institute places particular emphasis on the close connection between theory, modeling and experimentation using the most advanced technologies.

Jon Cohen and David Tank serve as co-directors of the Institute. They view the Institute as a stimulus for teaching and research in neuroscience and related fields, as well as an impetus for collaboration and education in disciplines as wide ranging as economics and philosophy. Princeton collaborators come from an array of disciplines including mathematics, physics, engineering, chemistry, computer science, ecology and evolutionary biology, and economics.

Kenneth Norman, Phd – Princeton

Professor of Psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Principal Investigator, Computational Memory Lab

A major focus of Dr. Norman's research is characterizing how different subregions of the medial temporal lobes (in particular, the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex) contribute to recognition and recall, and how the contributions of these structures differ from one another. He is also interested in how accuracy and distortion in episodic memory arise from interactions between medial temporal structures and prefrontal cortex.

I am my connectome

Sebastian Seung is mapping a massively ambitious new model of the brain that focuses on the connections between each neuron. He calls it our "connectome," and it's as individual as our genome -- and understanding it could open a new way to understand our brains and our minds.

Filmed July 2010 at TED Global 2010
Uploaded to YouTube on Sept. 28, 2010 by TED

Integrated approach to visual neuroscience

PI: Sebastian Seung, Princeton University
Title: "Vertically integrated approach to visual neuroscience: microcircuits to behavior"
BRAIN category: Understanding Neural Circuits

Dr. Seung and colleagues will use state-of-the-art genetic, electrophysiological, and imaging tools to map the connectivity of the retina, the light-sensing tissue in the eye. The goal is to delineate all the retina's neural circuits and define their specific roles in visual perception and behavior.

David Tank, PhD – Princeton

Henry L. Hillman professor of neuroscience and molecular biology; Co-Director of the Princeton Neuroscience Institute; and Director, Bezos Center for Neural Circuit Dynamics
At large Member of Multi-Council Working Group

Dr Tank's research interests include the measurement, analysis, and modeling of neural circuit dynamics. More recently, his work has focused on the mechanisms of persistent neural activity and the development and application of rodent virtual reality systems combined with optical imaging and electrophysiology to study neural circuit dynamics during navigation.

William Bialek, Theoretical Biophysicist

Theoretical biophysicist William Bialek discusses how our brain interprets information in a continuous way.

For more information about the BRAIN Initiative visit: nsf.gov/brain

NSF BRAIN Initiative
Published APRIL 28, 2014

Perceiving Brain: Mysteries of the Brain

Sabine Kastner, a professor of neuroscience and psychology at Princeton University, is studying how the brain determines what information is most important in everyday scenes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, Kastner is able to peek inside the brain and see what areas are active when a person sees a face, place or object.

"Mysteries of the Brain" is produced by NBC Learn in partnership with the NSF.

NSF BRAIN Initiative
Published June 9, 2015

Sebastian Seung, PhD – Princeton

Professor, Computer Science Department and Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Principal Investigator, Seung Lab

Seung is a multi-disciplinary expert whose research efforts have spanned the fields of neuroscience, artificial intelligence. physics and bioinformatics. His TED talk “I am my connectome” has been viewed more than 750,000 times. His book Connectome: How the Brain’s Wiring Makes Us Who We Are is considered by some as “the best lay book on brain science I’ve ever read.” Seung is also the organizer of the Citizens Science project/game called EyeWire.

Seung Lab – Princeton

Principal Investigator: Sebastian Seung
Princeton Neuroscience Institute

The Seung Lab uses techniques from machine learning and social computing to extract brain structure from light and electron microscopic images. EyeWire showcases our approach by mobilizing gamers from around the world to create 3D reconstructions of neurons by interacting with a deep convolutional network. The Seung Lab also develops computational methods for relating brain structure to function. Seung Lab is best known for our work on the reconstruction of neural circuits using serial electron microscopy.

Neural circuit dynamics in working memory

Principal Investigator: Carlos D Brody
Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Title: "Mechanisms of neural circuit dynamics in working memory"
BRAIN Category: Understanding Neural Circuits (RFA NS-14-009)

Dr. Brody and his colleagues will study the underlying neuronal circuitry that contributes to short-term "working" memory, using tools to record circuit activity across many brain areas simultaneously while rodents run on a track-ball through virtual mazes projected onto a screen.

Brodylab – Princeton

Principal Investigator: Carlos D Brody
Princeton Neuroscience Institute

Brodylab's focus is on novel quantitative behaviors that allow exploring high-level cognitive questions using powerful emerging tools for studying neural mechanisms in rats. The lab now uses rats to investigate the neural bases of decision making, working memory and executive control using a combination of high-throughput semiautomated behavior as well as computational, electrophysiological, pharmacological and optogenetic methods.

Carlos D Brody, PhD – Princeton

Professor of neuroscience and molecular biology, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator
Principal Investigator, Brodylab

Brody's focus is on novel quantitative behaviors that allow exploring high-level cognitive questions. Brody’s group now uses rats to investigate the neural bases of decision making, working memory and executive control using a combination of high-throughput semiautomated behavior as well as computational, electrophysiological, pharmacological and optogenetic methods.

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