Cornell University Neuroscience

Neuroscience at Cornell University, Ithaca campus, emphasizes an integrated and interdisciplinary approach. The Program in Neuroscience spans several graduate fields and includes faculty affiliated with many departments.

Faculty researcg encompasses neuroscience from human cognition to biophysics, including diverse experimental and computational approaches using a variety of model organisms. Graduate students acquire expertise in their primary disciplines while cultivating a broader understanding of the bigger picture.

Chris Xu, PhD – Cornell

Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies, Dept. of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University
Director, Xu Research Group

Xu's research has two main thrusts: biomedical imaging and fiber optics. He is exploring new concepts and techniques for in vivo imaging deep into scattering biological specimens, such as mouse brain; developing new medical endoscopes for non-invasive real-time diagnostics of tissues without any exogenous contrast agent and novel optical fibers and fiber-based devices for biomedical imaging and optical communications.

Xu Research Group – Cornell

Principal Investigator, Chris Xu
Cornell University

Xu Research Group has two main thrusts: biomedical imaging and fiber optics. The Group is exploring new concepts and techniques for in vivo imaging deep into scattering biological specimens, such as mouse brain; developing new medical endoscopes for non-invasive real-time diagnostics of tissues without any exogenous contrast agent and novel optical fibers and fiber-based devices for biomedical imaging and optical communications.

Optimization of 3-photon microscopy

Principal Investigator: Chris Xu
Cornell University
Title: "Optimization of 3-photon microscopy for Large Scale Recording in Mouse Brain"
BRAIN Category: Large-Scale Recording-Modulation - Optimization (RFA NS-14-008)

Dr. Xu and his collaborators will build new lasers and lenses to use three-photon microscopy to watch neuronal activity far deeper inside the brain than currently possible.

Skip to toolbar