SUNY Stony Brook Neuroscience

Summary

SUNY Stony Brook University's Neurosciences Institute is comprised of multi-disciplinary teams of clinical and research professionals with more than 70 laboratories actively pursuing breakthroughs in neurobiology, stroke, multiple sclerosis, autism, alzheimer's, spine and brain trauma, and behavioral neurosciences, to name a few.

The Stony Brook graduate program in Neuroscience, in the College of Arts and Sciences, offers doctoral training in neuroscience. Departments include Neurobiology and Behavior and Psychology.

SUNY Stony Brook  University’s Neurosciences Institute is comprised of multi-disciplinary teams of clinical and research professionals with more than 70 laboratories actively pursuing breakthroughs in neurobiology, stroke, multiple sclerosis, autism, alzheimer’s, spine and brain trauma, and behavioral neurosciences, to name a few.

The Stony Brook graduate program in Neuroscience, in the College of Arts and Sciences, offers doctoral training in neuroscience. Departments include Neurobiology and Behavior and Psychology.

Web Information

Neurosciences Institutehttp://neuro.stonybrookmedicine.edu/about

Graduate program in Neuroscience: https://www.grad.stonybrook.edu/brochure/neuro/

Department of Neurobiology and Behaviorhttp://medicine.stonybrookmedicine.edu/neurobiology/about

Department of Psychologyhttp://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/psychology/

Neurosciences Institute

Biomedical Engineering 

Our faculty are involved in cutting-edge research in the areas of biomechanics, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation, molecular biomedical engineering, tissue engineering, medical imaging and biomedical modeling. This work ranges from quantifying the dynamics of the cell membrane, to the evaluation of therapeutics in the clinic and provides the student the opportunity to contribute to our understanding of the etiology of disease, as well as design new modes of treatment. Indeed, we are fully committed to bringing science from the bench-top to the bedside.

In 1997, the University became the manager for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one of our country’s strongest federal research labs. That the lab is 15 miles from campus, interactions have thrived. As might be expected, a great deal of unique research instrumentation is available at BNL, making it a wonderful resource for both faculty and students. Strengthening this relationship, six faculty at BNL became early members of our graduate program in biomedical engineering (Professors Volkow, Springer, Gatley, Dilmanian, Fowler and Diaz), representing a significant portion of their world renowned Medical Department. Several graduate students have already taken rotations in the labs, with access to the National Synchrotron Light Source, 4T magnets, SPECT, PET, fMRI and other state of the art imaging equipment.

Unique Technologies Under Development

As evidence of our ability to bridge basic to applied science, BME faculty are in late stage development of several unique technologies, including:

* a non-invasive biomechanical intervention for osteoporosis (Rubin)

* tissue engineering to accelerate wound repair (Clark, Xu & Taichman)

* unique biomaterials for controlled drug and gene delivery to bone, skin, cartilage and heart (Chu, Hsiao & Chen)

* finite element optimization of cardiac valve prostheses (Bluestein & Krukenkamp)

* 3-D virtual colonoscopy (Kaufman & Liang)

* a semiconductor based data acquisition system for DNA sequencing (Luryi)

* design and fabrication of bioactive polymer thin films (Rafailovich)

* thermally sprayed composite biomaterials (Berndt)

* a scanning ultrasound diagnostic of bone material properties (Qin)

* soft x-rays to evaluate biological structure (Kirz & Jacobsen)

* informatics algorithms for gene regulatory analysis (Glimm, Skienna & Zhu)

* high resolution MRI, PET and SPECT instrumentation for the evaluation – and targeted treatment – of brain, heart and lung dysfunction (Springer, Button, Gindi, Reinstein, Diaz, Dilmanian & Volkow)

 

Department of Neurobiology and Behavior

The Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at Stony Brook University offers a university-wide PhD training program designed to provide broad training opportunities for students interested in careers in the neurosciences. Students can enter from their undergraduate training or through the MD/PhD program.

The PhD program provides a broad educational background in neurobiology, experience in teaching, and the opportunity to pursue original doctoral research in one of over 40 laboratories. The program includes scientists at SUNY Stony Brook, recently ranked number two in the Graham/Diamond study of public research institutions, at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, an internationally renowned private research institute, and at Brookhaven National Laboratory, a prominent multidisciplinary research facility of the U.S. Department of Energy.

 

Department of Psychology

Cognitive Science program

The Cognitive Science Program maintains active laboratories with state-of-the-art equipment for research and graduate training.  Shared laboratory facilities include a research dedicated 3T MRI scanner (housed in our NSF-funded SCAN center) and a 64-channel EEG system, both of which are integrated with remote eye tracking. Several remote or head-mounted eye trackers are also available for psycholinguistic and visual cognition and perception studies.

Interdisciplinary training is available in cognitive science, in cooperation with the Departments of Linguistics and Computer Science, and in cognitive neuroscience, in cooperation with the Biopsychology Program, the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, and Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Medical Department

Integrative Neuroscience

We are psychologists who care passionately about understanding how the brain can generate the richness of behavior seen in humans and in other animals. As such, our disciplines of Biological Psychology and Integrative Neuroscience are aimed at the identification of biological mechanisms that explain behavior. We might ask the following questions.

  • How do genes and environmental influences interact over the lifespan to become a person’s personality?
  • What goes wrong in neurological diseases and developmental disorders?
  • What brain systems are most critical for decision-making?
  • How does experience modify the brain?
  • How do addictive behaviors arise?

Where and How?

The current focus of our field is identification of biological mechanisms that underlie behavior and behavioral disorders. For example, we care about identifying the neural circuits involved in particular behaviors, cognition, traits, or emotions. The advent of fMRI has revolutionized our ability to conduct such studies in healthy human beings. Toward that goal, we have an NSF-funded 3T MRI at our SCAN (Social, Cognitive, Affective Neuroscience) Center, directed by Turhan Canli.

But localization is only a starting point in biological psychology. We also seek to understand how cells, neurochemicals and genes play their roles within those neural circuits to explain sensation, emotion, and movement. Additionally, we seek to identify the behavioral deficits that result from both neurological disorders in humans and animal models of those disorders.

 

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